ARTIST STATEMENT
For some time, I have been creating narratives written in copperplate calligraphy on chine colle etchings. These have primarily been family histories. I have always seen them as book pages – a collection of illustrated stories.

A few years ago, I began to combine the etching narratives into mixed media pieces called “Ancestor Houses”. Using recycled wood, discarded glass, and fired tiles on which I had written or drawn with glaze, I began to create a series of “volumes”.

My latest work includes many of the previous techniques – etchings, original stories in book form, and text. Some are hand-stamped directly into wood. I have used photo- lithographs and etchings to create a series modeled on Tibetan book forms...unbound pages between carved wooden covers. Some etchings serve as end papers in limited edition books. Some covers are etched or oxidized copper. I am currently adding letterpress text to linocut relief prints that I am able to print on a Vandercook Press. Articulating my personal narrative through prints, letterpress and book forms synthesizes who I am and what I have learned.

RECENT WORK
LIMITED EDITION BOOKS:
Hari-Kuyo, One
Hari-Kuyo, Two
Fude-Kuyo

These books are derived from the Japanese temple festivals of Hari-Kuyo and Fude-Kuyo.

Hari is the Japanese word for ‘needles’. Kuyo means ‘memorial service’. The temple ritual of Hari-Kuyo is performed to honor broken needles, and to thank them for their hard work. The origin of this festival lies in the Shinto belief that all living beings and objects have a soul and spirit.

Hari-Kuyo, One: The women in Daddy’s family sewed or quilted or crocheted. All except his sister Rose. And it wasn’t that she didn’t sew, it was that she was discouraged from sewing. Her haste was evident in her uneven, crooked stitches, a haste I was admonished not to emulate. But, they conceded, no one could make pies like Rose. I celebrate these women in my version of Hari-Kuyo.

HARI-KUYO, ONE (click on thumbnails for expanded views and captions):

Hari-Kuyo, Two: Mama was the only one in her family who could sew. Grandma had no interest in handwork, but for some reason felt duty-bound to teach me how to embroider. Our mutual impatience made us conspirators. I think it pleased her that my imperfect stitches matched her own. I celebrate these women in my version of Hari-Kuyo.

HARI-KUYO, TWO:

Fude-Kuyo: Fude is the Japanese word for ‘writing brushes’. Kuyo means ‘memorial service’. The temple ritual of Fude-Kuyo is performed to honor writing tools, and to thank them for their hard work. The origin of this festival lies in the Shinto belief that all living beings and objects have a soul and spirit,

FUDE-KUYO:
 

PRIVATE ACCOUNTS :
Flea Markets are archives: slices of life. They are repositories of people’s excesses, rejections, mistakes, legacies, inheritances and appropriations.

There is poignancy in some of the flea market cast-offs. Who sells bronzed baby shoes? Did the baby whose cherished first steps were immortalized become a disappointment as an adult? And, where are my great-grandparents’ portraits, sold by my Great Uncle’s lodger for the value of their frames?

Limited Editions of 15, not all available

FORGOTTEN LIVES:
 

ABANDONED LIVES:
   

WHOSE SHOES? :
 

FRAGMENTS, SNIPPETS, THOUGHTS AND THINGS, ONE & TWO:
 

ANCESTOR CODICES (all 1/1):


BOOK PAGES:

Synoptic: The Ties That Bind: Hail Mary Hail Mama
When Mama decides to convert to a fish-on-Fridays Catholic, will Daddy cease to be a lapsed Catholic and return to the church he left in adolescence?

When Father Grineau prays for the conversion of the unrepentant children of the marriage, how can he know that prayers are being said for him to find a nice woman and get married?

Will the prayers of an innocent child cause turmoil in the life of the handsome French Canadian priest, causing him to eschew the church?

This first novel explores the fear a child experiences when prayers seemingly are answered with unexpected consequences. Follow the musings and final revelations of our young protagonist as she finally comes to realize how little effect she has on the complexities of a life.

   


TOLERABLE DIVERSITY:

Quite simply, this work is an attempt on my part to examine cultural tensions which seem implacable. The intent is to provoke thought about the impulse to erase those who are different. In these pieces I have created ”tolerable diversity” -- contexts in which objects representing opposing cultures co-exist, as distinct manifestations, not in isolation or assimilation, but sharing a space, with integrity. The hope is that we can move from co-existence to mutual respect, tolerance and appreciation.

>Full Artist's Statement (PDF)

MULTI-BLOCK RELIEF PRINTS IN LIMITED EDITIONS
 

HAND-COLORED ETCHINGS, HAND-MADE PAPER, EDITIONS OF 1
   

ETCHINGS, HAND-MADE PAPER, EDITIONS OF 10
 

MONOTYPES, HAND-MADE PAPER, EDITION OF 1
     

MIXED-MEDIA ASSEMBLAGES